Horsebox Studio Commission

ARTIST OPPORTUNITY:
Horsebox Studio Commission
Peak/Copa & Abergavenny Food Festival


August – September
Festival Weekend 16th & 17th September 2017

The Horsebox Studio Commission is a partnership project between Peak/Copa and the Abergavenny Food Festival. We are seeking a professional, Wales-based visual or applied artist of any discipline, to respond to the distinctive region of the Black Mountains and to the themes of the festival to produce new work in collaboration with the public, which will be created and presented in Peak’s Horsebox Studio on site during the festival weekend (16th and 17th September 2017).

Themes: growing, cooking, agriculture, sustainability, food culture, the politics and economics of food production, individual and collective memories of food, markets, small holdings

 

The artist must be available during the preparation and delivery of the festival weekend (16th and 17th September).

The artist is expected to spend a minimum of 8 days working on the research, preparation, delivery and evaluation of the commission (at least 4 days to be located in Abergavenny).

The Artist Commission is supported through Arts Council of Wales funding.

  • £2,500 artist fee inclusive of materials and production costs
  • Up to £150 travel expenses
  • Up to 4 x nights’ accommodation in Abergavenny (if required)
Click here for more information:
PeakCopa Horsebox Commission ENG Word doc
PeakCopa Horsebox Commission ENG  PDF

Or contact Rebecca Spooner, Creative Director rebecca@artsalivewales.org.uk / 01873 811579

The deadline for applications is 10am, Wednesday 19th July 2017.

 

Peak/Copa is an initiative devised and delivered by Arts Alive Wales, an arts education charity based in Crickhowell, Powys. Peak creates opportunities for contemporary art in the Black Mountains and Welsh Borders for the benefit of the region’s artists, communities and visitors.

 

////////////////////////////

 

CYFLE I ARTISTIAID:
Comisiwn Stiwdio Fan Geffyl
Peak/Copa a Gŵyl Fwyd Y Fenni


Gorffennaf – Medi.
Penwythnos yr Ŵyl 16 ac 17 Medi 2017

Mae Comisiwn Stiwdio Fan Geffyl yn brosiect partneriaeth rhwng Peak/Copa a Gŵyl Fwyd y Fenni. Rydym yn chwilio am artist gweledol neu gymhwysol proffesiynol o unrhyw ddisgyblaeth sydd wedi ei leoli yng Nghymru, i ymateb i ardal nodedig y Mynydd Du ac i themâu’r ŵyl gan gynhyrchu gwaith newydd mewn cydweithrediad â’r cyhoedd, a fydd yn cael ei greu a’i gyflwyno yn Stiwdio Fan Geffyl Peak ar y safle yn ystod penwythnos yr ŵyl (16 ac 17 Medi 2017).

Themâu : tyfu, coginio, amaethyddiaeth, cynaliadwyedd, diwylliant bwyd, gwleidyddiaeth ac economeg cynhyrchu bwyd, atgofion unigol a chyfunol am fwyd, marchnadoedd, tyddynnod

 

Rhaid i’r artist fod ar gael yn ystod paratoi a gweinyddu penwythnos yr ŵyl (16 ac 17 Medi). Disgwylir i’r artist dreulio o leiaf 8 diwrnod gwaith yn gweithio ar yr ymchwil, paratoi, cyflenwi a gwerthuso’r comisiwn (o leiaf 4 dydd i’w leoli yn y Fenni).

Caiff Comisiwn yr Artist ei gefnogi drwy nawdd Cyngor Celfyddydau Cymru.

Mae’r comisiwn yn cynnig y canlynol:

  • £2,500 ffi artist yn cynnwys deunyddiau, costau cynhyrchu ac unrhyw addasiadau i’r Stiwdio Fan Geffyl.
  • Hyd at £150 costau teithio
  • Hyd at 4x noson o lety yn y Fenni (os yw’n ofynnol) yn ystod y cyfnod ymchwil a phen wythnos yr ŵyl.
Cliciwch yma am ragor o wybodaeth:
PeakCopa Horsebox Commission CYM Word doc
PeakCopa Horsebox Commission CYM  PDF

 

Neu cysylltwch â Rebecca Spooner, Cyfarwyddwr Creadigol rebecca@artsalivewales.org.uk / 01873 811579

Y dyddiad cau am ymgeisio yw 10am, dydd Mercher 19 Gorffennaf 2017.

 

Menter yw Peak/Copa a ddyfeisiwyd ac a gyflenwir gan Arts Alive Wales, elusen addysgol gelfyddydol a leolir yng Nghrucywel, Powys. Mae Copa yn creu cyfleoedd am gelf gyfoes yn y Mynydd Du ac ar y ffin er budd artistiaid a chymunedau’r ardal a’r ymwelwyr â hi.

 

 

Advertisements

Enthusiasm

Saturday 1st July 2017, 12-10pm

 

Redhouse, Old Town Hall, High Street, Merthyr CF47 8AE

 

FREE

 


Peak/Copa is pleased to support Enthusiasm

 

A project by Victoria Donovan and Stefhan Caddick

 

Enthusiasm is a migration story spanning Merthyr Tydfil and Ukraine; the 1860s to the present day. This innovative, interdisciplinary one-day arts event brings together musicians, members of the community, archivists and historians to take a radical look at a little-known historical episode that links Merthyr and the South Wales Valleys to the Donbas in Ukraine and asks how the legacy of this past continues to resonate in our social, cultural and political landscape today.

For more information visit: www.stefhancaddick.co.uk

In 1869, Welsh industrialist John Hughes founded the mining town of Donetsk in Eastern Ukraine, initiating a wave of migration from South Wales to Eastern Europe. 1917 and the approaching Russian Revolution saw the hasty exit of the industrialists who had followed Hughes, fearful of the revolutionary ferment. 100 years later, in the present day, Ukraine and the Donbas are once again at the centre of a violent conflict that has led to the internal displacement of over a million  people.

Enthusiasm will bring to life some of the elements of this fascinating and timely story, via film, music, image, food and discussion.

Enthusiasm includes:

• Performance of a selection of migrant letters by local and diasporan voices.

• Exhibition of historic photographs of Donetsk from the Glamorgan Archives and contemporary images by Ukrainian photographer Alexander Chekmenev

• A programme of workshops and activities

• Screening: Enthusiasm: The Donbass Symphony (1931) by Ukrainian revolutionary film maker Dziga Vertov with a new original score performed live by composer Simon Gore.

 

View a pdf of the full programme for the day 

Dr Victoria Donovan, originally from Cardiff, is a cultural historian of Russia based at the University of St Andrews. Donovan was selected as one of ten academics in the ‘New Generation Thinker 2016’ scheme.
www.ahrc.ac.uk

 

Stefhan Caddick is a visual artists who works in video, installation and performance. His practice is often a collaborative engagement that sources its materials from institutions, communities and individuals.
www.stefhancaddick.co.uk

Project Partners: 
University of St AndrewsGlamorgan ArchivesRussia 17, Peak/Copa: Contemporary Art in the Black Mountains, Redhouse Cymru

Image credit: 
Image: still from Dziga Vertov’s Enthusiasm: The Donbass Symphony (1931) (from the collection of the Austrian Film Museum. Frame enlargement Georg Wasner)

Limelight / Calcholau

Rob Smith & Charles Danby

Cardiff Contemporary
www.cardiffcontemporary.co.uk

Limelight : an archive

Castle Arcade, Cardiff
22 October – 19th November
Tuesday – Saturday 11am-6pm / Sunday 11am-5pm

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Limelight
is a project developed by collaborative artists Rob Smith and Charles Danby, based in Newcastle. Supported by Peak/Copa and the Canal & River Trust, the project researches and responds to the working landscape of canals, quarries, tramways and kilns that serviced the lime industry of the rural Black Mountains which in turn fed the nation’s heavy industries that roared through South Wales.

For their Cardiff Contemporary commission, the artists have used digital means to bring reflections on this history to urban audiences by streaming live illuminations at nightfall from Llangattock Limekilns in the heart of the Brecon Beacons National Park to the Welsh capital and online. The live stream event (on 22nd October) presented multiple perspectives of landscape, combining live with recorded footage, audio and performance in an immersive experience. The illuminations were created with limelight itself, an intense, pure white light generated through heating quicklime at high temperature, used in the 19th century for land survey work and stage lighting. Each live broadcast will lasted as long as it took for the chemical reaction to be exhausted.


Peak/Copa pitched up its Horsebox Studio outside Cardiff Castle during the opening weekend of Cardiff Contemporary (Friday 21st – Sunday 23rd October)
 which acted as a resource space for members of the public with an intriguing collection of artist films, vintage books, maps and lime materials related to the Limelight project.


Rob and Charles organised a replica limekiln burning at Llangattock during their research week in the Black Mountains in September 2016
. The public event introduced the project and facilitated discussion about the lime industry and canal network.

 

ARTIST INFORMATION

Artists Rob Smith and Charles Danby are based in Newcastle and have collaborated since 2011. Rob brings a materially engaged approach to digital technologies, exploring the possibilities of live and networked art such as Radiometer (2011) and Field Broadcast – a live streaming project that enables artists to make live broadcasts from remote sites. Charles brings wide academic and curatorial experience challenging conventional approaches to archives and British art histories including projects such as Grand National – Art from Britain, Vestfossen, Norway (2010), Animated Environments, Siobhan Davies Studios, London (2011-12) and Das Traumann at Baltic (2015). He is a senior lecturer at Northumbria University.

In 2014 Smith and Danby organised Revisiting the Quarry, a symposium in conjunction with the Hayward exhibition Uncommon Ground: Land Art in Britain 1966-79 at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. In 2014 the artists were commissioned as part of Shelter, a project on Lindisfarne, Northumberland. Taking limestone from a quarry on the island they made a small scale lime kiln and produced quicklime that was subsequently used to create new sculptures called Repaired Rocks. These works repaired limestone rocks from the quarry, extending themes of industrial process within the landscape and the nature of post-industrial reparation to a site.
www.danbysmith.com

 

PROJECT INFORMATION

Peak/Copa creates opportunities for contemporary art in the Black Mountains for the benefit of the region’s artists, communities and visitors. The inspiration for Peak lies in an enthusiasm for the exceptional artists working in the Black Mountains and the distinctive, natural landscape of the region as a unique resource. Peak works in partnership with environmental and heritage organisations such as Canal & River Trust, The Landmark Trust and the Brecon Beacons National Park Authority. These organisations share Peak’s vision for bringing artists, sites and audiences together. Peak/Copa is an Arts Alive Wales initiative.
www.peakart.org.uk  

Cardiff Contemporary is a citywide festival of contemporary arts, showcasing a programme of exhibitions, events and activities over five weeks.  20 October – 19 November.
www.cardiffcontemporary.co.uk

Limelight is part of the Canal & River Trust 2016 Arts on the Waterways programme. The programme offers time and space to artists, producers and curators to make new work and engage new audiences for both the waterways and the arts.
www.canalrivertrust.org.uk

Peak is one of five projects currently supported by the Digital Innovation Fund for the Arts in Wales, a strategic partnership between Arts Council of Wales and Nesta. The partnership is helping arts organisations in Wales to experiment with digital technology as a tool to reach new audiences. Peak is working in collaboration with BBC Cymru Wales to research the use of live-streaming digital technology in site-specific locations in the Brecon Beacons National Park.
www.innovation.arts.wales

Established in 1995, Ty-Mawr Lime Ltd has made an enormous contribution to resurrecting the use of traditional building materials.  Ty-Mawr has gone on to become a market leader in the design, manufacture and distribution of environmentally-friendly building materials and systems, providing a ‘one-stop’ shop for its customers and clients across the UK.
www.lime.org.uk

CONTACT

For more information contact: Rebecca Spooner, Creative Director
rebecca@artsalivewales.org.uk / 01873 811579

(photo credits: Jon Pountney & Toril Brancher) 

Noctule

Noctule credit Jon Poutney

A special commission from Peak for the Green Man Festival 2016

Farm Hand the solo project of Mark Daman Thomas (member of Islet and founder of Shape Records) collaborated with artist Stefhan Caddick who works in video, installation and performance. The pair created a new, site-specific live performance called Noctule, taking place underground in Eglwys Faen (Stone Church), a cave on the Llangattock Escarpment, three miles from the Green Man festival site. The piece responded to the unique acoustics, history and habitat of the cave system – one of the biggest in Europe and home to a colony of Lesser Horseshoe bats.

You can read an interview with Stefhan Caddick and Mark Daman Thomas, published online with The Wire www.thewire.co.uk about the collaborative process and logistical challenges of creating Noctule.

On Tuesday 16th August 2016 an audience of 10 people took part in a guided walk through the dramatic Craig Y Cilau National Nature Reserve to experience the performance in the cave and discover the unique ecology and history of the landscape along the way.

The recording of the performance was screened at Peak’s Horsebox Studio and experienced by 750 people throughout the Green Man festival weekend.

‘What a fantastic idea, I wish I had been there’ 

‘A truly immersive experience’

‘A very inventive concept and I love the horse box’ 

 

Musician and Designer, Emma Daman Thomas created a limited edition of 50 x A3 Risograph prints in celebration of Noctule.
Prints are £15 each + postage & packing. To purchase a print please contact: rebecca@artsalivewales.org.uk 

print
Emma Daman Thomas limited edition print

 

(photography: Jon Pountney)

Noctule was supported by:

Little scraps of countryside

Two young writers from the Arts Alive WalesCaban Sgriblio project respond to Rebecca Chesney’s residency in the Brecon Beacons National Park.

I’m not sure where I was expecting Rebecca Chesney’s Snapshot: Colours of the Brecon Beacons exhibit to be held, but it wasn’t in a room painted with canal water!

Of course, it wasn’t literally canal water. It was a colour from Rebecca Chesney’s colour chart – number 21, Mon & Brec, “a cold colour from Monmouthshire and Brecon canal water.” Though I didn’t immediately realise it, that was the first colour I saw of Chesney’s amazing selection of 96 colours inspired by the Brecon Beacons.

To collect the colours she stayed for six weeks in the National Park, split into a week in November 2015 and two and a half weeks in January and March 2016. During this time, she went walking almost every day over the picturesque mountains, into abandoned quarries and through rolling, soft, green fields. Taking endless photographs and collecting samples, she slowly built up an enormous palette of colours she associated with her time in the Beacons.

Back to the celebration. In the centre of the room were displayed an array of photos Rebecca had taken of everything, from clear streams gleaming over dark, smooth stones, to the head of a shot fox with its tongue lolling out from between its teeth, and a sheep’s ribcage surrounded by coarse white wool. Some of the photographs were of things you wouldn’t usually think to take pictures of – things you would normally try and avoid – like rusted farm machinery, half buried in the green-cloaked ground, or a bloated sheep’s corpse caught on branches in a river, along with rubbish and plastic.

She had samples too – feathers, red-brown like rust; soft, grey fur; pressed flowers, moss, lichen, even pieces of plastic and silage wrap. All of these she had collected in the National Park, and all had contributed in some way to her final colours.

And at the end of the room, there it was. In a white frame, behind perfectly clear glass, a beautiful selection of 96 colours, culled from her experiences, ranging from the vivid “Intrepid” to “Bale twine blue” or the bright, eye-catching “Gorse flush”. Not every colour was quite so blinding – we mustn’t forget the soft grey of “Newborn lamb” or the delicate shade “Blossom of blackthorn”.

They weren’t just colours – every shade had a definition explaining where the colour came from and what it meant to Rebecca, sometimes accompanied by a fact about the Brecon Beacons. Rebecca told us that she hoped the definitions would give people a hint of the story behind each hue and that in using some of the colours, they might build up their own “snapshot”.

Rebecca Chesney made a speech once everybody was present and explained all about her residency. She thanked us all for coming and then thanked specific people for their efforts in relation to the project; we heard how a local artist guide supported her to take her to interesting places in the National Park, from farms to mine shafts.

Personally I found Rebecca’s approach fascinating and unusual. It was like she had taken a place, with all its features, wildlife, population and landscapes and boiled it down to its essence. I usually think of a place in terms of whole images, but this colour palette was something just as unique and in fact it was unique not only to the place, but to the person and time of year as well. It is a way of representing a location that I had never considered before but was just as effective and open to personal interpretation.

Rebecca Chesney’s project made me think about places and colours in an entirely new way, and I thoroughly enjoyed the experience. Thank you Rebecca, Peak and Arts Alive Wales!

By Roxy
Age 13
Gwernyfed High School

 

When I went to Arts Alive Wales to attend the Peak launch of Rebecca Chesney’s “Snapshot”, I was expecting paintings of the views or maybe abstract takes on them. Perhaps photos of the landscape and scenery, hence the name “Snapshot”?

I walked in and there was not a painting in sight. Granted there were photos, but not the ones I’d been expecting. The first image that caught my eye was a decaying sheep carcass entangled in low tree branches in a small stream, quite contrasting my expectations. Another image which I wasn’t prepared for was a tree, in a field with black plastic snared around it. When I first thought about it, I was confused about why someone would want to capture such grim sides of the Brecon Beacons, as usually sights like that would be purposely avoided in photography.

Everyone was still setting up when I arrived at the Arts Alive Wales studio. My friend Roxy was with me the whole time, examining the exhibition too. I was introduced to the artist Rebecca Chesney and to the Creative Director, Rebecca Spooner. The similar names made it rather confusing, but I managed to gain a grasp. I also gained a grasp of a large quantity of really delicious welsh cakes, but I don’t think that they were a part of the exhibition!

I picked up a grey card leaflet entitled;

Snapshot
Colours of the Brecon Beacons
By Rebecca Chesney

The card was quite thick and had a bumpy texture, which made a satisfying whooshing sound when I ran my thumb across the front of it. The typeface on the front was plain and black. It had a simple and rather uniform look to it.

I opened it up to see an entire spectrum of coloured squares, each with a fascinating title underneath it. Some were quite normal sounding, like white being named “Fallen Snow”. Others however were really very strange and some, rather funny. A good example of this, and one of my personal favourite titles went with a brownish red and was called “Faint Echo.” Other entertaining names were “Jelly Ear”, “Shot Fox”, “Dog’s Breath” and “King Alfred’s Cakes”.

There were 96 colours on the leaflet in total each with an interesting description. Rebecca explained during her talk that colours were not just chosen to represent appearance, but to represent all of the things that she’d found out about the Beacons in her six weeks here. Using the views of all the people she’d met and everything she’d seen, she compiled a collection of hundreds of colours and narrowed it down to 150. Finally, she picked the 96 colours which featured in “Snapshot”.

Rebecca Chesney wanted a dynamic palette of different interests, so she tried to meet as many people as possible connected to the Park. Another aspect of the exhibition was the Light Box. It was, as the name suggests a box full of light. It had a translucent top where the light glowed through. On the top were little pieces of paper with little scraps of countryside on them. There was a snip of pony hair, a clump of lichen and a yellow, pressed flower. There were also, little bits of black plastic and green litter.

It was when looking at this that I realised why such ugly parts of the country-side were being presented in “Snapshot”. It was because everything, the rusting agricultural equipment, the plastic litter and even the rotting corpses were all now part of the landscape and as revealed in the colour chart, Rebecca wanted to show everything.

The exhibition, I think gave me a new perspective on the countryside. I think that it is very original to portray the landscape in such an unusual way and it works beautifully. The final result of Rebecca Chesney’s work, I think really sums up the Beacons terrifically well and the name “Snapshot” fits perfectly.

By Amelie Williams
Age 13
Gwernyfed High School

With thanks to Gwernyfed High School

caban-logo-low-430x174

SNAPSHOT Colours of the Brecon Beacons

12. Selenium Lick 
A cheerful blue from the bucket containing this livestock supplement 

Rebecca Chesney is the first Artist-in-Residence for the Black Mountains, in partnership with Peak and the Brecon Beacons National Park Authority. Rebecca completed a six-week residency during winter 2015/16.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

18. Joyride
Obligatory burned out car at the bottom of a disused quarry. 

Rebecca, based in Preston, Lancashire, was selected from over 120 applications received from artists across the UK and Europe following an open call. Rebecca’s projects are specific to the locations she works in and take the form of installations, interventions, drawings, maps and walks and are underpinned by research into the protection of the environment. Her work is ‘concerned with how we perceive the land: how we romanticise, translate and define urban and rural spaces.’ In relation to the residency Rebecca was particularly interested in ‘the economic value of attracting visitors to the National Park and how that is balanced with the protection of its ecology.’ Rebecca has worked extensively across the UK, including residencies at Yorkshire Sculpture Park, the Bronte Parsonage Museum in Haworth and the Wordsworth Trust in Grasmere, as well as projects in India, South Africa and the Netherlands. www.rebeccachesney.com

29. Shot Fox
A luscious and mesmerising red from a freshly killed fox.

During the residency Rebecca met with the Black Mountains Land Use Partnership, Bradley Welch, Senior Ecologist BBNPA, Alan Bowring, Geopark Development Officer BBNPA (who both contributed greatly to development of the final artwork), Helen Roderick and Ceri Bevan Sustainable Development Officers BBNPA, and many local artists, farmers and wardens. Rebecca walked and photographed the landscape extensively, building a collection of hundreds of images.

Rebecca’s residency resulted in SNAPSHOT Colours of the Brecon Beacons, a unique colour chart that visualises the many layers of the Brecon Beacons environment during winter. The chart represents the complex and unique relationships between agriculture, tourism, industry, ecology, culture and economy; some of the colours complement each other whilst others clash. A different season and location would result in a radically different palette. Snapshot is an attempt to reflect the realities of living and working in the Brecon Beacons; the stuff that goes on behind the observed veneer of landscape.

The SNAPSHOT paint chart was professionally designed and printed in a limited edition of 400. The charts were given away during a celebratory event on Saturday 11th June 2016 at the Arts Alive Wales studio in Crickhowell. 100 of the charts were posted to arts and educational colleagues across Wales and the UK. The celebratory event was followed by an informative guided walk by geologist Alan Bowring on the Llangattock Escarpement.

The remaining charts were sold at £10 each and income supported Arts Alive Wales charitable projects in the local community. The paint charts are now sold out.  

53. Bale Wrap Green
A contemporary synthetic shade developed to blend with natural green tones

Arts Alive Wales supported Rebecca to deliver a programme of artist talks and cyanotype workshops for 68 local young people in response to the residency.


Ty Mawr, an ecological building products company situated on the banks of Langorse Lake developed paint shade no ‘21. Mon & Brec’ (A cold colour from Monmouthshire and Brecon canal water. Opened in 1799 it was used to transport coal, lime, iron ore and agricultural products) which was used to redecorate the Arts Alive Wales studio.

Click here to read more about Rebecca Chesney’s residency.

22. Passing Shower
Reminiscent of the lightweight waterproofs available to the rural day-tripper.

————————–

With thanks to:
Brecon Beacons National Park Authority staff especially Helen Roderick, Ceri Bevan, Bradley Welch, Alan Bowring
Practitioners: Pip Woolf, Kirsty Claxton, Jane Bennett, Penny Hallas, Lyndon Davies, Melissa Hinkin, Emma Geliot
Blaenau Gwent Learning Zone, Merthyr Tydfil College, Gwernyfed High School. 

& the many local individuals, organisations and businesses who contributed to the residency. 

Photo credits: Toril Brancher / Film & Photo credits: Nic Finch

Rebecca Chesney selected for PEAK Artist Residency

PEAK and the Brecon Beacons National Park Authority are delighted to announce that artist Rebecca Chesney has been selected as the first Artist in Residence for the Black Mountains, from over 120 applications.

Rebecca, based near Preston, Lancashire responded ‘I’m absolutely delighted to have been selected for the PEAK residency. It’s such an exciting opportunity to be a part of and I and can’t wait to get started.’

Rebecca’s projects are specific to the locations she works in and take the form of installations, interventions, drawings, maps and walks and are underpinned by research into the protection of the environment.Her work is ‘concerned with how we perceive the land: how we romanticise, translate and define urban and rural spaces.’ In relation to the residency Rebecca is particularly interested in ‘the economic value of attracting visitors to the National Park and how that is balanced with the protection of its ecology.’ 

Rebecca has worked extensively across the UK, including residencies at Yorkshire Sculpture Park, the Bronte Parsonage Museum in Haworth and the Wordsworth Trust in Grasmere, as well as projects in India, South Africa and the Netherlands.

Rebecca Spooner, Arts Development Manager said: ‘We were overwhelmed by the response to the first PEAK residency and really appreciate the time and energy that artists commit when applying for an opportunity like this. Rebecca’s work was a natural fit with the interests of PEAK and the Brecon Beacons National Park, particularly her concern with the perception of rural environments and communities. We also feel that Rebecca’s approach will question us and really encourage us to think about what we want to achieve through a residency programme.’

Rebecca will complete a week of research in the Black Mountains in autumn 2015 and then a five week residency, based near Llangynidr between Jan-March 2016. Rebecca will contribute to the PEAK blog and post news of public events and talks. PEAK will also deliver a series of creative sessions for local young people in response to the residency.

www.rebeccachesney.com

The PEAK & BBNPA Artist Residency is funded by:

Unknown-1
ACW_logo_CMYK_portraitWG_Sponsored_land_col

Lottery_landscape_CMYK

The Morel Trust

With thanks to :
Artists Pip Woolf & Kirsty Claxton
Artist Jane Bennett
The Eco Travel Network